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Lottery Application for 2021 is now open!

If you would like to view a recording of our Information Night please email Kirsten at chairstellerparentgroup@gmail.com

Steller Secondary School, a part of the Anchorage School District, offers an alternative to standard (large school) education. We have about 200 students in grades 7-12 from the Anchorage area, all of whom attend the program by choice. The primary emphasis is on responsibility to self and to the Steller community. Students, parents, and staff participate in the democratic process of setting school policy and procedures. Students play an integral role in planning activities, from deciding when and where to have dances to what courses should be offered. In addition to participation in the operation of the school, students are encouraged to spend some of their time at Steller in community service in order to learn more about and contribute to the larger community in which they live.

While many of our classes are on an honors level and our academic standards are high, Steller does not offer phase level or advanced placement classes, nor do we have an interscholastic sports program. Instead Steller students participate in sport programs and take specialty classes at a school of their choice. At least eighty percent of our graduates attend a college or university. Several classes are taught seminar style, with an emphasis on close analysis and discussion. Students design contracts with teachers for independent study or self-directed learning courses not offered in the curriculum, or students may elect to teach a class to their peers. Many of our students take local university courses. Many students elect to pursue community service.

Students who do well are able to become self-directed and self-disciplined enough to take charge of their own learning to a large extent. During the course of their years at the school, students usually become more independent and able to make good decisions for themselves. There is no one typical Steller student.

Students can join Steller in any grade 7 through 12.  The deadline for the ASD Lottery  Application is March 18th.

To learn more about the Steller Philosophy, Intensives, Passages and more please visit the “Prospective Students” tab on our website, and the ASD website here

Questions? Call our Administrative Assistant Tami at 907.742.4950

View Our Brochure Here

Middle School Students Perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream

This quarter two middle school language arts drama classes performed plays from the Mechanicals and Fairies in Midsummer Night’s Dream. They developed a variety of techniques to make the work come to life on Zoom. They’re adorable, hard-working, and talented, and we’re proud of their successes! Becky

 

 

 

 

Well done to everyone involved! 

Kirsten

Opportunity for Students

Mental Health Advocacy Through Storytelling (or MHATS) is a group of Anchorage high-school-age students who tell stories of mental health triumphs in order to combat the stigma surrounding mental illness and open up conversations.

Over ten meetings, we learn to tell true and personal 5-7 minute stories in the style of Arctic Entries/Storyworks/the Moth. We also learn advocacy skills– how to stand up for yourself and others. In addition to storytelling, in this session, we will be learning about what mental health education looks like in schools and advocating for House Bill 60, which would put K-12 mental health education into Alaska State law.

To learn more visit their website here. 

To register here:

https://forms.gle/RY8sQZqCX9KZytHTA 

Elizabeth Peratrovich Day!

 

Elizabeth Peratrovich, who played an instrumental role in the 1945 passage of the first anti-discrimination law in the United States. In 1941, after encountering an inn door sign that read “No Natives Allowed,” Peratrovich and her husband–both of Alaska’s Indigenous Tlingit tribe–helped plant the seed for the anti-discrimination law when they wrote a letter to Alaska’s governor and gained his support. 

Elizabeth Peratrovich—whose Tlingit name is Kaaxgal.aat, a member of the Lukaax̱.ádi clan of the Raven moiety—was born on July 4, 1911 in Petersburg, Alaska during a time of extensive segregation in the territory. She was lovingly raised by adoptive parents, living in various small Southeast Alaska communities throughout her childhood. With a passion for teaching, Peratrovich attended college in Bellingham, Washington where she also became reacquainted with her husband, Roy Peratrovich, who was a student at the same school. The couple married and moved to Klawock, Alaska where their role in local politics and Elizabeth’s knack for leadership drove her heavy involvement with the Alaska Native Sisterhood, one of the oldest civil rights groups in the world, leading to her eventual appointment as the organization’s Grand President. 

Seeking better access to lawmakers who could help effect change, the Peratrovichs moved in 1941 with their three children to the Alaskan capital of Juneau, where they were met with blatant discrimination. When attempting to buy a home in their new city, they were denied when the sellers saw they were of Alaska Native descent. Instances like these were unfortunately common for Alaska’s Indigenous peoples and further motivated Peratrovich to take action in the name of systemic change. 

Elizabeth and Roy worked with others to draft Alaska’s first anti-discrimination bill, which was introduced in 1941 and failed to pass. On February 5, 1945 following years of perseverance, a second anti-discrimination bill was brought before the Alaska Senate, and Peratrovich took to the floor to deliver an impassioned call for equal treatment for Indigenous peoples. She was met with thunderous applause throughout the gallery, and her moving testimony is widely credited as a decisive factor in the passage of the historic Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945.

In 1988 the Alaska State Legislature declared February 16 as “Elizabeth Peratrovich Day,” and in 2020 the United States Mint released a $1 gold coin inscribed with Elizabeth’s likeness in honor of her historic achievements in the fight for equality.

Thank you, Elizabeth Peratrovich, for helping to build the foundation for a more equitable future.

 

(Taken from Google Doodles)

Student Showcase – Jainy D.

 

In Senior Spanish we read the magical realism story Chac Mool by Carlos Fuentes. Jainy interpreted the transformation of Chac Mool from statue to human using detailed drawings as described in the story and direct quotations that set the scene for the transformation.

Submitted by Ashley 

English/Spanish teacher

Beautiful work Jainy!

Steller Artists featured at Youth Art Month

Steller would like to celebrate our students who have been selected to participate in the Anchorage School District’s Youth Art Month show. The following Artists and their pieces were selected to represent Steller:

This year because of the Covid 19 pandemic we are unable to display physical works in person, but we have created an online digital show through a partnership with the Anchorage Museum. The show will go live on March 5th for First Friday. The show link is not active yet, but it will be available March 5th at https://www.anchoragemuseum.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/.

The Fine Arts Department will be hosting Youth Art Month Drive-In events throughout the month of March to celebrate and showcase students’ artwork. 

The drive-in events will begin around sunset. The slideshow is approximately 1.5 hours. The slideshow will start with elementary, alphabetically by school with secondary following. The following rules are in place during the event:

  • Please remain in your car throughout the slideshow
  • Masks are required by all participants in the car if windows are open
  • There are no bathrooms at the event, please plan accordingly
  • Please follow guidance from the traffic directors
 

Thank you in all your support and enthusiasm for the visual arts. We hope to see you at one of our drive-in events. 

This year Anchorage School District is celebrating our 49th annual Youth Art Month show. Youth Art Month exists to: 

  • Recognize art education as a viable factor in the total education curriculum that develops citizens of a global society.
  • Recognize art is a necessity for the full development of better quality of life for all.
  • Direct attention to the value of art education for divergent and critical thinking.
  • Expand art programs in schools and stimulate new art programs.
  • Encourage commitment to the arts by students, community organizations, and individuals everywhere.
  • Provide additional opportunities for individuals of all ages to participate in creative art learning.
  • Increase community, business, and governmental support for art education.
  • Increase community understanding and interest in art and art education through involvement in art exhibits, workshops, and other creative ventures.
  • Reflect and demonstrate the goals of the National Art Education Association that work toward the improvement of art education at all levels.

Submitted by Philip 

Fine Arts Teacher

Follow Steller Facebook Page and Help Promote our School

Did you know that Steller has a Facebook Page? We use this page to promote Steller to the public, and prospective students, and to share information that may be relevant to our extended community like alumni. If you are on Facebook we encourage you to:

  • Like  and Follow our Page
  • Like and comment on our posts
  • Share our Page with your friends

We share content highlighting student accomplishments, select information from ASD, and other community events.  When you interact with our page it helps the Facebook algorithm find us more easily. 

Thanks for your support! 

REMINDER: To join our Information Night on Zoom use this link